White-eyed Vireo

Field Trip Schedule Change!

Allentown Sod Farms trip now Sun., August 25

Poisonous Plants with Mark Manning, Sat., August 24 

Click slider arrow for more info, watch for updates

Blackburnian Warbler © Tyler Christensen

Colorful World of Birds

Cassie Stoddard is an assistant professor studying color perception in wild hummingbirds at Princeton University.

Blackburnian Warbler © Tyler Christensen

Allentown Sod Farm

Join us as we look for migrating shorebirds.

White-eyed Vireo

Field Trips

Experienced birders from WCAS lead regular birding field trips in New Jersey and eastern Pennsylvania, visiting some of the region’s top birding hotspots. Most of our field trips are free, open to the public, and require no advance registration. All experience levels welcome… Learn More

 Yellow Warbler © Tyler Christensen

Research

WCAS provides support for several active research projects, including funding two bird monitoring sites here in central New Jersey and in the Central American country of Costa Rica. These projects provide data on both breeding and wintering populations of our vulnerable… Learn More

Blackburnian Warbler © Tyler Christensen

Birdathon 2019!

Join us at the height of spring migration on International Migratory Bird Day, Saturday May 11 . Everyone is invited to join one of the WCAS-guided walks or bird on their own. You do not need to be an expert birder to participate. Beginners are welcome. Minimum donation of $20 per person. 

Welcome to our new website and stay abreast of our initiatives!

Northern Saw-whet Owl © Tyler Christensen

Washington Crossing Audubon Society is a non-profit organization dedicated to the enjoyment and protection of birds, wildlife, and the environment through education, research, and conservation.

Washington Crossing Audubon Field Trip to Institute Woods, Princeton © Tyler Christensen

Experienced birders from Washington Crossing Audubon lead regular birding field trips in New Jersey and eastern Pennsylvania, visiting some of the region’s top birding hotspots.

Chestnut-sided Warbler © Tyler Christensen

Washington Crossing Audubon supports several active research projects, including funding two bird monitoring sites here in central New Jersey and in the Central American country of Costa Rica.

Reporting Sensitive Species

BIRDERS SHOULD TAKE CARE IN REPORTING SENSITIVE SPECIES TO EBIRD OR BIRDING FORUMS.

Roosting owls are particularly vulnerable to disturbance.   Nesting eagles should not be approached too closely. The exact location of any nest of a threatened, or endangered species or a species of conservation concern should not be given.   However records of these birds are critical in conservation efforts.

 

WCAS and eBird developed a protocol for reporting sensitive species after roosting Long-eared Owls were harassed at the Pole Farm. The protocol suggests that the exact location not be reported and that the entry be delayed or hidden. Unfortunately, this protocol has broken down with the use of the eBird app. People report sightings in real time at the exact location. These sightings end up on eBird alerts. A delay of a week would keep the records off the eBird alerts.

e-Bird Guidelines for reporting sensitive species

I enter roosting owls after April 1.  The records are then available for conservation purposes but the owls have moved on. I prefer not to hide records because I rely on eBird records for conservation support and hidden records are not available for conservation. The best approach is to delay reporting to eBird using a general location but immediately report the exact location of the sighting to the NJ Fish and Wildlife Commission using the Rare Wildlife Sightings Form https://www.state.nj.us/dep/fgw/ensp/rprtform.htm .

CHRISTMAS BIRD COUNT PRINCETON: 12/16/18 TRENTON: 12/29/18

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REPORT RARE WILDLIFE ALONG PENNEAST TO NJDEP

BALDPATE MOUNTAIN IS A SPECIAL PLACE

Upcoming Talks

Upcoming Field Trips

Birding Hot Spots!